Introduction

High Park Facts and Figures

High Park Facts and Figures

by High Park Nature

High Park contains some of the most significant natural areas in the City of Toronto including:

  • an outstanding concentration of provincially and regionally rare plant species
  • provincially rare black oak savannahs
  • regionally rare moist red oak and hemlock forests
  • locally significant examples of lakeshore marsh, natural bottomlands and dry red oak/white oak upland forests.
Indian Grass in the Black Oak Savannah. Photo: Karen Yukich
Indian Grass in the Black Oak Savannah. Photo: Karen Yukich

Sources

News & Sightings

Tuesday, April 20 – TRCA’s 2019 Terrestrial Biological Inventory of High Park Sign up for this virtual presentation

SEE NEW LINK BELOW! Learn about the Toronto & Region Conservation Authority’s methodology, findings and observations as presented in the final High Park Terrestrial Biological Inventory Report, 2019. There will be an opportunity to ask questions about the report. Urban…

5 Important Ways to Protect Wildlife in Toronto As Spring approaches, we look forward to a new year of gardening, stewardship, bird watching and protecting the natural habitats we care about.

As Spring approaches, we look forward to a new year of gardening, stewardship, bird watching and protecting the natural habitats we care about. Some things can be accomplished by groups of people and others can be done at home. For…

Leave the Leaves for Wildlife and more things to do this spring… Don't clean-up your garden just yet insects need some time to grow

Now that spring-like weather is here, we gardeners are desperate to “get in the garden” but the insects need us to hold on just a little bit longer. Garden waste pickup begins next week (March 15) but we urge you…

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High Park Facts and Figures

High Park contains some of the most significant natural areas in the City of Toronto including:

  • an outstanding concentration of provincially and regionally rare plant species
  • provincially rare black oak savannahs
  • regionally rare moist red oak and hemlock forests
  • locally significant examples of lakeshore marsh, natural bottomlands and dry red oak/white oak upland forests.
Indian Grass in the Black Oak Savannah. Photo: Karen Yukich Indian Grass in the Black Oak Savannah. Photo: Karen Yukich

Natural Heritage in an Urban Setting

Quick Facts


  • The total area of High Park is 161 ha (hectares). This includes Grenadier Pond (14.5 ha) and several other wetlands, creeks and ponds (10.6 ha); the balance (135.9 ha) is terrestrial.
  • Over half (51.7%, 83.25 ha) of High Park has been designated in Toronto’s Official Plan as an Environmentally Significant Area (ESA).
  • Almost two-thirds (64%, 102.98 ha) of High Park is designated by the Province of Ontario as an Area of Natural and Scientific Interest (ANSI). (The ESA and ANSI areas overlap.)
  • About two-thirds of High Park excluding Grenadier Pond (96.9 ha) is considered “natural areas” or “natural cover”.
  • High Park has 71 vegetation communities. These support 549 plant species that are naturally-occurring, of which 309 are native.
  • 152 plant species found in High Park are considered to be of conservation concern (L1 to L4 using TRCA’s ranking system).
  • The plant community in High Park is ranked G1, i.e. critically imperilled on a global basis.

Sources

Ecology

History

Birds

Mammals

Herps

Fish

Insects

Trees + Shrubs

Wildflowers

Grasses

Wetland Plants

Invasive Plants

Research

Restoration

Volunteer

Maps