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Custodians:

Volunteer Opportunities 

High Park Stewards meet on the 2nd & 4th Sundays of each month, rain or shine.

 
 

2020 Sessions

 

High Park Stewards meet on the 2nd & 4th Sundays of each month, rain or shine.

Jan 26 - Indigenous Land Stewardship in Tkaronto

Speakers: Members of the Indigenous Land Stewardship Circle

10:30 am to 12:30 pm, HOWARD PARK TENNIS CLUB, 430 Parkside Drive

At this event, members of The Indigenous Land Stewardship Circle will share their visions of a path toward restoring Indigenous stewardship to Tkaronto’s oak savannahs. Depending on the weather we may integrate an outdoor experience for the participants.

We are at capacity for this presentation.

High Park’s rare oak savannahs, with their widely spaced oak trees, tall prairie grasses and wildflowers, are not just sites of scientific and natural interest. These are sacred lands; lands which have been and continue to be sites of subsistence, sovereignty, and ceremony for Indigenous peoples in the region. Indigenous people used fire to sculpt and maintain these lands for millennia before colonization. Tkaronto's oak savannahs lie within the Dish With One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant, a treaty made by the Haudenosaunee Confederacy and the Anishinaabe Nations to share in the care of these prime hunting and foraging grounds. The remnants of oak savannahs scattered throughout Toronto today are perhaps the most visible and lasting monuments to Indigenous legacies on these lands.

Indigenous land care protocols are very different from conventional approaches to ecological restoration, which depend heavily on pesticides. Indigenous stewardship is a form of harm reduction and climate action, and it gives Indigenous people the opportunity to heal from the traumas of colonialism by engaging the land in ceremony and in community, creating opportunities for passing on land-based teachings to future generations.

 

Jan 12 - Celebrating the Natural Environment in High Park

(How Healthy is High Park? Urban Forestry Update, TRCA Flora and Fauna Survey, and Monitoring Results has been postponed)

Speakers: Karen Yukich, Leslie Gooding and Sharon Lovett

10:30 am to 12:30 pm, HOWARD PARK TENNIS CLUB, 430 Parkside Drive

The Natural Environment Committee has been advising the City of Toronto on the protection and restoration of the natural features of High Park since 1993. Please join us for a discussion of what has been accomplished through cooperative citizen engagement and what challenges lie ahead. We can also use this opportunity to share personal highlights of what makes High Park so special.

Karen Yukich, Leslie Gooding and Sharon Lovett will be facilitating the discussion and there will be lots of photos of our restoration work.

pdf of the High Park Terrestrial Inventory Report, 2019 and

Other TRCA Biological Inventories

 
20+ years of Stewardship
Stewards plant in spring and fall
Many birds live and migrate through the park
Dark-Eyed Junco
 

Jan 12 - How Healthy is High Park? This presentation has been postponed!

Jan 12 - How Healthy is High Park? Urban Forestry Update, TRCA Flora and Fauna Survey, and Monitoring Results

Speakers: Urban Forestry and TRCA Staff

10:30 am to 12:30 pm, HOWARD PARK TENNIS CLUB, 430 Parkside Drive

RSVP YES "ticket" on EventBrite (do not print)

High Park has had over 25 years of habitat restoration work to preserve and enhance the colony of rare and specialized plants found in the Black Oak Savannah, a sandy and dry micro-climate that is sadly very diminished in North America. The pressures on the park from recreational use and development are in direct opposition to this endeavour. How is the park standing up to the pressures?

The Toronto and Region Conservation Authority completed a flora and fauna survey in High Park in 2018. At this first Winter Speaker Series event, the presentation of that report will be given by the TRCA. There will also a be a presentation of Urban Forestry work in High Park, a preview of 2020 plans, and information on the Vegetative Monitoring Protocol that began in 2019.

Policies and Reports

 
Some of the resources to identify plants
There's no end to learning
Black Oak Monitoring 2015
Cones are wrapped around the seedlings protect them
 

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Content last modified on January 29, 2020, at 03:52 AM EST