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HIGH PARK NATURE

 

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HIGH PARK NATURE is a joint project of the High Park Natural Environment Committee and High Park Stewards. We welcome your feedback, suggestions, articles and photos. Please contact us at mail@highparknature.org

ABOUT THE PHOTOS: Most of the photos on this site were contributed by local photographers and taken in High Park. Please do not copy or reproduce them without permission. If you would like to contribute photos (low resolution) for this website, please contact us at mail@highparknature.org

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Volunteer Opportunities 

High Park Stewards – 2013 Sessions

 

High Park Stewards meet on the second and fourth Sundays of each month.


2013 Sessions and Printable 2013 Calendar

Stewards 2013 Brochure

Photos from:

 

Also see High Park Stewards Facebook Group including updates on the Elite Invasive Squad's conquest over garlic mustard.

Follow us on

 

Native Plant Sale

 

Thanks to all of our volunteers who have planted, seed collected, watered and weeded over the past year. We will have some very interesting winter educational and greenhouse sessions.

 

 

2013 in Review

In 2013, much of our work took place in the Tablelands, a beautiful example of the remnant Black Oak Savannah, which is an endangered ecosystem that needs to be preserved and protected. Both the spring and fall planting events were held in the fenced restoration area just northwest of the Labyrinth. A secondary spring planting was held in the 10A restoration site near Bloor Street.

The Tablelands, which at one time was a mowed lawn, now shows promising signs of natural regeneration of red and black oaks, and rebounding populations of native tall grasses such as Big Bluestem, Little Bluestem, and Indian Grass, as well as typical savanna wildflowers such as Wild Bergamot, Woodland Sunflower, and Black-eyed Susan, legumes such as Showy Tick Trefoil and Round Headed Bush Clover, and shrubs such as New Jersey Tea, St. John’s Wort, and Smooth Rose.

Invasive species removed this year include: garlic mustard, tall white sweetclover, hedge parsley and Asiatic bittersweet. Native ragweed was also removed in the Tablelands. This fall over 3 sessions, Common Buckthorn was busted in 7B and 8A.

Over the three planting events, we planted a total of 2,575 plants.

Over the three buckthorn busters events, we removed buckthorn from a total of 8,000m2 in 7B and 8A.

These are huge accomplishments, which help to move us forward in our mission of ecological restoration. Much thanks to all volunteer stewards for an excellent season! Enjoy the holidays and we hope to see you all next year.

 

Buckthorn Busting 1-2-3 - Sunday Oct. 27, Nov. 10 and Nov. 24

Our last 3 sessions of the year are Buckthorn Busting. On November 24 it will be followed by a pot-luck lunch.

Update Dec. 1: Thanks so much to the fabulous group who came to these sessions. Even with the weather changing every 10 minutes, we have cleared an 8,000 sq. metres of buckthorn and learned new skills too.

Please meet us in front of the Grenadier Restaurant at 10:30 am. We will go to our site from there so please try to come on time.

The annual pot-luck lunch will be made easier if when you receive the invite you check the Pot-Luck feature. This way we can all tell what is needed based on the replies. If in doubt, don't worry about it, bring something you would like to share. Since there is only one small microwave, items that can be served cold or at room temperature are preferred. If you have any suggestions on improving our program we can share that too. All participating Stewards are invited.

More on Buckthorn: This highly invasive shrub forms dense even-aged thickets that often cause an overall reduction in the establishment of shade tolerant native shrubs and herbs. It rapidly produces seeds early in the season that are highly viable and germinate quickly.

European Buckthorn on Invasive Plants Atlas and European Buckthorn (pdf) and HPN Invasive Plants

Also see 2012 Sessions for photos of previous Buckthorn sessions.


The Boulevard Bed Group
October 27, 2013
The Amazing Buckthorn Busters!
October 27, 2013
The next generation of Stewards
October 27, 2013
What 30 people can do in 2 hours
October 27, 2013
Buckthorn plants produce a huge amount of seeds
Let's catch them before they spread
A special volunteer supervised the session
Green Darner Dragonfly - Oct 27, 2013
 

Fun in the Nursery- Sunday, Sept. 22

It looks like a bit of everything....in the Nursery. Seed collecting, transplanting, weeding, digging, planting...

This is one of our few trips to the Native Plant Nursery, which is not a public area but is one of the most beautiful places in the park.

We can collect seeds from a number of plants, Cardinal flower, Blue lobelia, Harebell, Milkweed, and from a variety of grasses including Bottlebrush and Indian. Black-Eyed Susan, Cup Plant, Woodland Sunflower, Verbena and many others are still blooming. Bumblebees are enjoying Goldenrod and and a wide variety of asters including Sky-Blue, New England and Heath.

Meet us in front of the Grenadier Restaurant at 10:30am. and we will go together from there. There is restricted access via a gate so please be on time. We meet rain or shine, but not during lightning storms.

We are working outside and you need to keep yourself safe and healthy.

Please wear long pants, long sleeves. Wear shoes and socks, not sandals. Bring water, a hat, sunblock and a snack to keep your energy up. Gloves and tools will be provided. As you can see by the photo below, seeds can easily stick to non smooth fabrics.'''

Also see:

 

Seed Collecting
A wide variety of plants are ready
The Native Plant Nursery
The best place to see these plants in the park
Sky Blue Aster
Bumblebees are still hard at work
Common Milkweed
Essential food for Monarch butterfly caterpillars
Bottlebrush Grass
Sometimes the names of plants are obvious
Some plants have sticky seeds
please do not wear fleece or other non-smooth clothes
 

Fall Planting in the Tablelands- Sunday, Sept. 8

We will have a second planting in our new restoration site in the Tablelands behind the Grenadier Restaurant across from the Labyrinth". This is the time of year when many savannah plants are at their peak.

Some of the later summer flowers are coming up now including Black-Eyed Susan, Cup Plant, Woodland Sunflower, Verbena and there is a beautiful display of grasses like Big and Bittle Bluestem. Goldenrod and asters nare also beginning to bloom.

Meet us in front of the Grenadier Restaurant at 10:30am. and we will go together to the site. A small group may also be working on the Boulevard Beds. We meet rain or shine, but not during lightning storms.

Although we have removed a lot of it, if you are allergic to ragweed, please take an anti-histamine before the session.

We are working outside and you need to keep yourself safe and healthy. Although planting is more "friendly" than invasive species removal, there still may be ants and bees, thorns and plants that can irritate the skin. Please wear long pants, long sleeves. Wear shoes and socks, not sandals. Bring water, a hat, sunblock and a snack to keep your energy up. Gloves and tools will be provided. As you can see by the photo below, seeds can easily stick to non smooth fabrics.

Also see:

 

Showy Tick Trefoil
Its seeds inspired Velcro
Some plants have sticky seeds
please do not wear fleece or other non-smooth clothes
Little Bluestem
One of the signature Black Oak Savannah grasses
Canada Goldenrod
A magnet for pollinators
Cup Plant
Water collects at the leaf stem for insects and birds
Proper dress for all outdoor activities
We really want you to be protected
 

Protecting the Tablelands- Sunday, August 25

August brings a variety of different invasive species to remove. This time we will be focusing on Ragweed, a native plant that is becoming invasive in certain areas. It is presently covering our original restoration site, The Tablelands located behind the Grenadier Restaurant. For many years people thought that Goldenrod was the cause of sneezing and other allergic reactions, but the culprit was really Ragweed, a late summer "bloomer".

Some of the later summer flowers are coming up now including Black-Eyed Susan, Cup Plant, Woodland Sunflower, Verbena and there is a beautiful display of grasses like Big and Bittle Bluestem.

Meet us in front of the Grenadier Restaurant at 10:30am. and we will go together to the site. A small group may also be working on the Boulevard Beds. We meet rain or shine, but not during lightning storms.

If you are allergic to ragweed, please take an anti-histamine before the session or we have an alternate activity in the Boulevard Beds for a few people. We are working outside and you need to keep yourself safe and healthy. There are ants and bees, thorns and plants that can irritate the skin. Please wear long pants, long sleeves. Wear shoes and socks, not sandals. Bring water, a hat, sunblock and a snack to keep your energy up. Gloves and tools will be provided.

Also see:

 

Ragweed
A native plant but still invasive
Our sites can use some help
Site 10A August 2012
Little Bluestem
One of the signature Black Oak Savannah grasses
Proper dress for all invasive species removal
We really want you to be protected
 

Asian Bittersweet - Sunday, August 11

August brings a variety of different invasive species to remove. We will be working on Asian (or Oriental) Bittersweet, Celastrus orbiculatas a perennial woody vine that grows both laterally and vertically, smothering the understory and girdling trees.

Meet us in front of the Grenadier Restaurant at 10:30am. and we will go together to the site near our Sculpture Garden planted area. We meet rain or shine, but not during lightning storms.

We will be learning to distinguish this plant from the native American Bittersweet and will be unravelling it around other native species of plants as we cut it back. As you can see by the photos, the patch is very dense so proper attire is necessary.

We are working outside and you need to keep yourself safe and healthy. There are ants and bees, thorns and plants that can irritate the skin. Please wear long pants, long sleeves. Wear shoes and socks, not sandals. Bring water, a hat, sunblock and a snack to keep your energy up. Gloves and tools will be provided.

Also see:

 

Asian Bittersweet up close
High Park September 2010
Hedge Parsley
A problem all summer
Asian Bittersweet in a forest
note the vertical and horizontal growth
Wildlife need native plants to survive
July 22, 2012
August is a great time to see Dragonflies
August 17, 2012
Proper dress for all invasive species removal
We really want you to be protected
 

Hedge Parsley Pulls #2 & 3 - Sunday, July 14 and July 28

During our June 23 session in site 10A we did a second planting in that restoration area. There was not a lot of hedge parsley to remove at that time and no biting ants were found, however there are many invasives including Tall Sweet White Clover that require removing as well in our various restoration sites. The month of July will be spent on working on whatever is considered most important by our Urban Forestry Crew, decided very close to the session.

The sites for this have yet to be determined, so meet us in front of the Grenadier Restaurant at 10:30am. and we will go to the sites from there.

Spreading Hedge Parsley,Torillis arvenis has been doing just that and has become a major problem in our savannah sites. We will be going to site 10, at the north end of the park, where we planted last year to remove as much as we can. Let's put this plant where it belongs

We are working outside and you need to keep yourself safe and healthy. There are ants and bees, thorns and plants that can irritate the skin. Please wear long pants, long sleeves. Wear shoes and socks, not sandals. Bring water, a hat, sunblock and a snack to keep your energy up. Gloves and tools will be provided.

Also see:

 

These photos are from our planting session in June 2012 in Site 10A:

It will be a great chance to see the results of our twp plantings in this area last year.

First planting in Site 10A
June 8, 2012
Site 10 is doing very well
May 17, 2013
Weeding in the adjacent site
July 8, 2012
Monitoring growth of transplants
July 22, 2012
Hedge Parsley is very aggressive and spreading
July 25, 2010
Proper dress for invasive species removal
We really want you to be protected
 

Hedge Parsley Pull and Mini Planting in Site 10A- Sunday, June 23

Spreading Hedge Parsley,Torillis arvenis has been doing just that and has become a major problem in our savannah sites. We will be going to site 10, at the north end of the park, where we planted last year to remove as much as we can. Let's put this plant where it belongs

Additional info not on invite. We will also be doing a mini planting in site 10A.

IMPORTANT: Meet us at the site, or at the N. entrance of the park (from High Park subway) at Bloor and Colborne Lodge Drive.

Map of Site 10A

WEATHER ALERT: John from Urban Forestry will be at the site by 10:30. He will decide at that time if weather conditions are not favourable (e.g. if there is lightning). We're a hardy group and DO work during regular rain. If you have questions after 10:30 call 647-769-7740.

Biting ants have been found in a number of places in the park and some people are sensitive to plants in the parsley family. Please make sure to wear long pants, socks and closed shoes. Long shirts, hats, sunscreen and water are also recommended. Gloves and tools will be provided.

Also see:

 

Spring Planting - Sunday, June 9

Coming Back to the Tablelands

During our last session we removed garlic mustard from our first restoration site. This time we will be planting native plants in the heart of this site, located behind the Grenadier Restaurant, near the Labyrinth. Full Pingg Invite

Meet us in front of the Grenadier Restaurant at 10:30 am. Tools provided.

The Yonge-University-Spadina subway is closed this weekend between Union and Yonge station. Shuttle buses will be running but it may take longer than normal to get to High Park.

Biting ants have been found on the Tablelands. Please make sure to wear long pants, socks and closed shoes. Long shirts, hats, sunscreen and water are also recommended. Gloves and tools will be provided.

Also see:

 

 

The Tablelands, between the baseball diamond and the Grenadier Restaurant were the Stewards first restoration site with planting begun over a decade ago. It has been allowed to mature on its own for a number of years. Some invasives have appeared which we try to keep in check. There may still be some native lupines blooming during our session.

Site 7 was tarped for 2 years to kill invasives
May 2013
This is Site 7 as a picnic area
May 2007
 
Wild Lupines are great pollinator plants
May 20, 2012
The Tablelands also former Adopt-a-Plots
May 20, 2012
 
New plants have a better chance in weedless soil
June 2012
The area near Bloor St. was planted last year
June 2012
 


BEAN Garlic Mustard Pull - Sunday, May 26

The Biodiversity and Education Awareness Network BEAN has an excellent program that we are again participating in to help keep this species from further damaging our forests. As many people as possible are needed as there is no end of this plant in High Park. Full Pingg Invite

Meet us in front of the Grenadier Restaurant at 10:30 am. Tools provided. Please bring water, a hat, and cover your arms and legs.

Also see:

 

 

Garlic Mustard is an extremely aggressive invasive plant in woodland areas. Not only does it crowd out almost every other type of plant but is has an allopathic agent that hinders their growth. Once removed native species can be planted to restore some biodiversity. Areas where GM has been removed need to be monitored and tended for at least 5 years as there is a strong seedbank and root system left behind.

Celandine is also removed at this time
a pretty but also invasive plant that accompanies GM
Garlic Mustard
yes, it does smell like garlic and mustard
 

We have been removing Garlic Mustard from the Black Oak Cafe ravine site for the last several years. Each year it declines a bit, but there is still an enormous amount of it there. If we get a large enough group we can work in both areas.

 
Garlic Mustard comes up very easily
May 20, 2012
Garlic Mustard has a long taproot
May 20, 2012
 
A daunting but successful session
May 20, 2012
GM is packaged as garbage not yard waste
May 20, 2012
 

 

Sunday, May 12, 2013 Native Plant Sale

11:00 am to 2:00 pm. See Pingg Invite

The sale is in front of the Greenhouse, South of Centre Road from the Grenadier Restaurant. Parking is very limited at the restaurant so please use transit of bicycles or walk whenever possible. Map to Native Plant Sale and Greenhouse

All plants are grown in the High Park Nursery. In order to ensure fairness, large orders are only available after 1:00 from the remaining stock.

All proceeds support the Stewardship program and native plant restoration in High Park.

Please see our special page for the sale which includes photos and plant lists. Native Plant Sale

Plant Sale Flyer for 2013 (pdf) Please help us by printing this and putting up posters where you think people will appreciate it.

 
Apple and Cherry Blossoms and Native Plants
photo taken on May 6, 2012
Bring your plant babies home to grow
photo taken on May 6, 2012
 
Blazing Star amd Monarch Butterfly
why we grow native plants
 
Rare Plants of the Endangered High Park Black Oak Savannah will be available for $10 at the sale.

For more  information about this Volunteer Stewardship Program Guidebook, please see this poster (pdf) or Rare Plant Book Page

 

 

Sunday, April 28, 2013

Spring Cleanup #2 - Update

10:30 am to 12:30 pm. See Pingg Invite

Meet in front of the Grenadier Restaurant and the groups will go our locations from there.

Thanks to the fabulous group of volunteers who came on April 14 we got a lot of work done in the Boulevard Beds and the Nursery. We will be working in two groups depending on the size, one will be in the nursery and the other will do garlic mustard removal on the slope next to the Black Oak Cafe.

All tools will be provided, but dress in layers as the temperature is unpredictable.

Please bring anything you may wish to drink or snack on with you as there is no kitchen available.

We uncovered a lot of plants in the Nursery
photo taken on April 14, 2013
Garlic Mustard is one of the early risers
Protecting the Nursery from invasives
 
Uncovering the winter survivors
photo taken on April 14, 2013
Garlic Mustard and Avens - time to go
photo taken on April 14, 2013
 

Spring has come late but hopefully this time we can see some of the spring ephemerals including Blood Root and May Apple as well as discover what other plants survived the winter.

 
Skunk Cabbage
An early bloomer - it warms the soil and melts snow
Bloodroot
A beautiful spring ephemeral
 
Wild Ginger
A very subtle flower
May Apple
A carpet of umbrellas
 

 

Sunday, April 14, 2013

Nursery and Boulevard Bed Cleanup

10:30 am to 12:30 pm. Meet in front of the Grenadier Restaurant and one group will go to the native plant Greenhouse as a group, the other will work on the Boulevards Beds.

It's time to uncover the plants in the Nursery and remove some of the dead stalks from the Boulevards Beds and let the sunshine in. It's been a later spring than in the last few years, but hopefully we can see some of the spring ephemerals including Blood Root and May Apple as well as discover what other plants survived the winter.

All tools will be provided, but dress in layers as the temperature is unpredictable.

Please bring anything you may wish to drink or snack on with you as there is no kitchen available.

See what you can identify in the Boulevard Beds
Make our Savannah plant showcase shine through
Uncover native plants in the Nursery
Find out what we will have for planting and our sale
 

 

Sunday, March 24, 2013

Transplanting in the Greenhouse

10:30 am to 12:30 pm. Meet in front of the Grenadier Restaurant and we will go to the native plant Greenhouse as a group. Please be prompt as gates may be locked afterwards.

This session has limited room and is by invitation to core members and frequent VSP volunteers. RSVP to invitation (PINGG) required.

It's finally time to transplant the seedlings that have been growing over the winter. These will be used for plantings in different parks and for our native plant sale. This work will be done in the cold frame native plant greenhouse. All tools will be provided, but dress in layers as the temperature is unpredictable.

Please bring anything you may wish to drink or snack on with you as there is no kitchen available.

Rootbound plants need our help
Plants are used in the park and for our plant sale
Transplanting in the Greenhouse
a special session for core volunteers
 

PLEASE SET CLOCKS AHEAD ONE HOUR ON SATURDAY NIGHT

 

Sunday, March 10, 2013

Restoration Success Story with Graham Buck, MNR

View PINGG invitation to this session

Directions

 

Howard Park Tennis Club, 430 Parkside Drive Toronto, ON M6R 2Z3, 10:30 am to 12:30 pm.

The first light S. of Bloor from Keele. It's the brown building in the back. Please enter via the bottom door.

The presentation will cover a restoration project I started in 2005 for an area called the Grand River Plains. The Grand River Plains, located in North Dumfries Township of Waterloo Region and Brant County/Brantford at the time of European Contact with First Nations, contained 25,000 hectares of tallgrass prairie and oak savanna. This represented 1/4 of southern Ontario's total prairie and savanna, which is estimated to have been roughly 100,000 hectares.

Today less than 50 hectares of tallgrass prairie and oak savanna remains in the Grand River Plains. Work on the most significant remnants began in the late 1990s and by 2005 serious momentum to restore the remnants had been built. However trouble may lie ahead as momentum appears to be decreasing.

Monitoring a tallgrass restoration site
photo: Grand River Conservation Area
Early Fall Asters and Prairie Grasses
High Park Sept. 2012
 

Graham Buck is a Species at Risk Biologist - Guelph District for the Ministry of Natural Resources. His presentation is on his work at The Grand River Conservation Authority

Graham Buck is passionate about the preservation of native landscapes and their recovery through ecological restoration and naturalization. To this end he owns and operates Nith River Native Plants, a company that specializes in native plants and seeds.

Graham also works a Species at Risk Biologist with the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources where he advises people on the Endangered Species Act and volunteers with the not for profit organization Tallgrass Ontario to recover tallgrass prairie and oak savanna habitats. Graham lives in Guelph, Ontario with his wife Bronwen and two sons Dylan and Roy.

 

 

Sunday, February 24, 2013

Invasive Species Management with Steve Smith

View PINGG invitation to this session

Directions

 

Howard Park Tennis Club, 430 Parkside Drive Toronto, ON M6R 2Z3, 10:30 am to 12:30 pm.

The first light S. of Bloor from Keele. It's the brown building in the back. Please enter via the bottom door.

Learn about the latest techniques and management protocols on invasive species control from someone who has been at the forefront of restoration in Ontario and is currently involved in invasive species management in High Park.

Buckthorn plants produce a huge amount of seeds
Most of our fall work is Buckthorn removal
Invasive Species Removal - Hedge Parseley
Bloor St. N. site July 2012
 

Steve Smith is the founder of Urban Forest Associates Inc.(UFORA)

Steve Smith
founder of Urban Forest Associates Inc.

Steve is a forester and certified arborist with the firm Urban Forest Associates Inc., a small firm in Toronto. He has supervised hundreds of ecological restoration projects throughout Ontario over the past 30 years, working with many partner groups. He has been a member of the Task Force to Bring Back the Don in Toronto since 1991 and is a founder of the Society for Ecological Restoration, Ontario Chapter, and a member of the Ontario Invasive Plant Council.

Steve works with homeowners, businesses and municipalities to manage individual trees, forests and natural gardens. Much of his work involves control of invasive plant species. He is the author of the current invasive plant list used in Ontario.

 

Steve Smith has generously provided us with a copy of his presentation to the High Park Stewards on Feb. 24, 2013. Management of Invasive Species in Toronto Parks This is an excellent practical resource guide. Steve Smith is the founder of Urban Forest Associates Inc.(UFORA)

 

 

Sunday, February 10, 2013

Seed Cleaning in the Greenhouse

View PINGG invitation to this session

Directions Working sessions in the greenhouse are by invitation to our core members (those working on special projects and frequent volunteers) due to space restrictions.

 

10:30 am to 12:30 pm. Meet in front of the Grenadier Restaurant and we will go to the Greenhouse as a group.

If you are taking the subway, give yourself extra time. There is no subway service on Sunday between Kipling and Keele. Shuttle busses will be available.

This session has very limited room (25 people) and is by invitation to core members and frequent VSP volunteers. RSVP to invitation (PINGG) required.

If you are a frequent volunteer and did not receive an invitation by February 3, please contact stewards@highparknature.org.

For more information on using seeds in restoration projects. See page 23 in particular for seed cleaning: - Planting the Seed (pdf) Environment Canada

Seeds collected last year are ready to be cleaned
Greenhouse, Winter 2012
Separating the seeds from the flower pod/head
Sunflowers have one of the easier seeds to clean
 

Sunday, January 27, 2013

In Search of Organics: Restoration in the Age of Climate Change and Invading Worms, with Dale Leadbeater

View PINGG invitation to this session

Howard Park Tennis Club, 430 Parkside Drive Toronto, ON M6R 2Z3, 10:30 am to 12:30 pm.

The first light S. of Bloor from Keele. It's the brown building in the back. Please enter via the bottom door.

Ecologist Dale Leadbeater brings years of experience when she speaks on best practices for ecological restoration and the role of the earth under our feet in successful and lasting restoration.

“Ecological restoration is an intentional activity that initiates or accelerates the recovery of an ecosystem with respect to its health, integrity and sustainability*.” The tools we use to manage recovery of ecosystems include prescribed burns, invasive plant species control and plantings that range from wildflowers, sedges and grasses to shrubs and trees. We target historical ecosystems as goals for restoration. But the key is “sustainability”.

Alien Earthworms, Extirpated Beetles and Ovenbird Decline: Why Restorationists Care about Soil.

What tools do we have to make our projects sustainable? What role does the soil play in creating, maintaining and enhancing native ecosystems? Where does soil come from? Where does it go? Why is it a major reason why restoration projects struggle and fail? What can be done to mitigate the problems?

*Society for Ecological Restoration International Science & Policy Working Group, October, 2004. SER International Primer on Ecological Restoration, Version 2

The SER International Primer on Ecological Restoration

Deadfall helps develop new soil
photo: Sharon Lovett
Spring growth in decaying trees
photo: Sharon Lovett
 

Dale Leadbeater, B.Sc., B.Ed. Senior Ecologist, SLR Consulting (Canada) Ltd.

Dale has worked in the field of environmental assessment since 1978. Her areas of expertise include landscape ecology, vegetation community analysis and inventory, wildlife assessment, wetland evaluation and impact assessment, mitigation and restoration. She designed and taught the training course for the Ecological Land Classification (ELC) for Southern Ontario for ten years. Dale is certified as a Wetland Evaluator under the Ontario Wetland Evaluation System. She is on the Board of the Society for Ecological Restoration and her recent work has focused on integration of natural heritage as an integral part of managing sustainability and in planning for healthy, sustainable communities. Dale lives in an "off-grid" home designed to minimize her ecological footprint and maximize passive efficiencies on 200 acres purchased as conservation lands to provide a significant upland addition to the Provincially Significant Raven Lake Wetland Complex. (from Dale's public LinkedIn page)


We encourage you to RSVP to the the Pingg invitations that are sent for each session so we have an idea of how many people are coming. Refreshments will be served.

If you would like to be added to the list please email stewards@highparknature.org.


 

Restoring Cities, with Deborah Dale, Sunday Jan. 13, 2013

View PINGG invitation to this session

Howard Park Tennis Club, 430 Parkside Drive Toronto, ON M6R 2Z3, 10:30 am to 12:30 pm.

The first light S. of Bloor from Keele. It's the brown building in the back. Please enter via the bottom door.

The "controversial" boulevard & front yard garden
photo: Deborah Dale

Find out how different groups in Toronto and other cities are working on restoring wildlife habitats and combatting invasive species in natural, private and public spaces. See how individual yards can link together synergistically, to restore not only habitat and biodiversity but creativity and innovation. Some examples are Seattle’s “pollinator pathway” and Vancouver’s student boulevard planters for homeowners project.

After the presentation we will have a discussion of ways that we can create more public engagement in transforming/restoring Toronto's biodiversity. This will include a look at Deborah’s new web sites, Verdigrow and her “Grow Up” Toronto program to encourage front yard and boulevard plantings and other habitat restoration programs while combatting bad bylaws and educating the public.

There is still a lot to do but our work has made a difference in our private and public spaces.

 

You may submit garden photos (low resolution please) to stewards@highparknature.org with a copy to ddale@verdigrow.com to be compiled for the discussion and bring printed photos as well.

Deborah Dale is a biologist; past-President North American Native Plant Society; former Recycling Coordinator/Solid Waste Specialist City of Scarborough and President Verdigrow Ltd. Her native plant garden (above) has been targeted by Scarborough’s MLS department using the Weeds and Tall Grass and other bylaws since 2003.

 

This session will be followed at 1:00 pm by a meeting of the High Park Natural Environment Committee at the High Park Nature Centre next to the Tennis Club. Everyone is invited. Agenda


Our winter presentations will focus on successful restoration and other related projects. Topics and dates will be posted when available.

We encourage you to RSVP to the the Pingg invitations that are sent for each session so we have an idea of how many people are coming. Refreshments will be served.

If you would like to be added to the list please email stewards@highparknature.org.



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