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HIGH PARK NATURE

 

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HIGH PARK NATURE is a joint project of the High Park Natural Environment Committee and High Park Stewards. We welcome your feedback, suggestions, articles and photos. Please contact us at mail@highparknature.org

ABOUT THE PHOTOS: Most of the photos on this site were contributed by local photographers and taken in High Park. Please do not copy or reproduce them without permission. If you would like to contribute photos (low resolution) for this website, please contact us at mail@highparknature.org

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Custodians:

Volunteer Opportunities 

High Park Stewards – 2016 Past Sessions

High Park Stewards meet on the 2nd & 4th Sundays of each month, rain or shine.

ABOUT OUR PROGRAM

CONTACT TO VOLUNTEER

UPCOMING SESSIONS

PAST SESSIONS

PLANTS & SITES

BROCHURE 2016


Buckthorn #3, Boulevard Beds and Pot-Luck Lunch Nov. 27

Our last session of the year is Buckthorn Busting and Boulevard Beds (or fence preparation) and will be followed by a pot-luck lunch. current Pingg invite

Please meet us at 10:30 am in front of the Grenadier Restaurant.

Pot-Luck Lunch info

Please bring food that does not need to be heated up. We will drop off our lunch contributions at the Greenhouse then go to our site from there.map of park The lunch will begin at 12:30pm

Buckthorn Busting is a very popular activity for students who want to collect volunteer hours and for anyone who likes being outdoors and finds satisfaction in helping our restoration efforts by clearing large areas of this invasive shrub. You can really see the difference a few hours of work can make.

IMPORTANT INFO FOR STEWARDS

All Stewards need to sign a City waiver document once a year. To save time at the sessions please print and fill out these 2 pages prior to coming. We will also have them on site. Waiver Form

More on Buckthorn: This highly invasive shrub forms dense even-aged thickets that often cause an overall reduction in the establishment of shade tolerant native shrubs and herbs. It rapidly produces seeds early in the season that are highly viable and germinate quickly.

European Buckthorn on Invasive Plants Atlas and European Buckthorn (pdf) and HPN Invasive Plants

 
Becoming a Buckthorn Buster
photo from October 2015
Buckthorn plants produce a huge amount of seeds
Let's catch them before they spread
We collected at least 3 truckfulls
photo from October 23, 2011
Buckthorn busting is great for students
collect volunteer hours
Buckthorn Busters 2015
November 22, 2015
Some plants have sticky seeds
please do not wear fleece or other non-smooth clothes
 

Buckthorn Busting and Boulevard Beds: Oct 23, Nov 13 and 27

Our last 3 sessions of the year are Buckthorn Busting. On November 27 it will be followed by a pot-luck lunch. current Pingg invite

Buckthorn Busting is a very popular activity for students who want to collect volunteer hours and for anyone who likes being outdoors and finds satisfaction in helping our restoration efforts by clearing large areas of this invasive shrub. You can really see the difference a few hours of work can make.

Location Change for Buckthorn Group

Please meet us at 10:30 am. The Boulevard Beds group meets in front of the Grenadier Restaurant. The Buckthorn group will be meeting near Parkside Dr. and High Park Blvd. map to buckthorn session and map of park

(South on Parkside Drive from Keele subway, west on High Park Boulevard)

IMPORTANT INFO FOR STEWARDS

All Stewards need to sign a City waiver document once a year. To save time at the sessions please print and fill out these 2 pages prior to coming. We will also have them on site. Waiver Form

More on Buckthorn: This highly invasive shrub forms dense even-aged thickets that often cause an overall reduction in the establishment of shade tolerant native shrubs and herbs. It rapidly produces seeds early in the season that are highly viable and germinate quickly.

European Buckthorn on Invasive Plants Atlas and European Buckthorn (pdf) and HPN Invasive Plants

 
 

Seed Collecting - Sunday, September 25

10:30 am to 12:30 pm. WE WORK IN RAIN BUT NOT LIGHTNING STORMS!

There may be several options for people this session so we need a lot of volunteers. Friends and families are welcome. There will be 2 sites for seed collection, the Nursery and a Restoration site. In addition, a small group will be working in the Boulevard Beds surrounding the Grenadier Restaurant.

Please do not wear fleece or other non-smooth clothes as seeds stick to them (see photo below)

see Pingg invite

The High Park Greenhouse Native Plant Nursery, which is not open to the public (but is for us) has a wide variety of native plants as do our restoration sites where Urban Forestry will select the most beneficial one for seed collecting. We will be collecting a variety of native grasses such as Canada Wild Rye, Little and Big Bluestem, Indian, Bottlebrush and Panic Grass. There are also many different types of wildflowers that are ready to harvest for next year.

These include Cardinal flower, Blue lobelia, Harebell, Milkweed, Black-Eyed Susan, Cup Plant, Woodland Sunflower, Verbena and many others are still blooming. Bumblebees are enjoying Goldenrod and and a wide variety of asters including Sky-Blue, New England and Heath asters.

We will meet in front of the Grenadier Restaurant at 10:30 and go to the various locations from there. Please be on time as the Nursery gates are locked after our arrival and we don't know which additional site we will be working in.

See Grasses and Sedges and Planting the Seed, Environment Canada, especially page 23: Seed Collecting Tips.

It takes many seed heads to provide the seeds needed
we will do seed cleaning during the winter
Native grasses are in their prime in fall
Wild Rye, Little and Big Bluestem
Seed Collecting
A wide variety of plants are ready
The Native Plant Nursery
The best place to see these plants in the park
Sky Blue Aster
Bumblebees are still hard at work
Common Milkweed
Essential food for Monarch butterfly caterpillars
Bottlebrush Grass
Sometimes the names of plants are obvious
Some plants have sticky seeds
please do not wear fleece or other non-smooth clothes
 

Fall Planting - Sunday, September 11

10:30 am to 12:30 pm. WE WORK IN RAIN BUT NOT LIGHTNING STORMS!

Meet us in front of the Grenadier Restaurant at 10:30 am. Tools provided. Please bring water, a hat, and cover your arms and legs. Please wear socks and closed shoes as well. Full Pingg Invite

We will be working in the Tablelands which is our oldest restoration site (over 20 years). We are continuing to plant in what used to be a concrete picnic area. You can easily see the results of our last 4 years of planting and the spring prescribed burn.

We hope to plant many forbes, grasses and shrubs in this site in the Tablelands so lots of hands are needed.

UPDATE: We planted a total of 1285 plants, including 2 trees and 32 shrubs. The species that we planted are:

Black Oak, Bush Honeysuckle, Shrubby St. John's Wort, Big Bluestem, Canada Wild Rye, Little Bluestem, Indian Grass, Sand Dropseed, Common Milkweed, Butterfly Milkweed, Blue Harebells, Pointed Leaved Tick Trefoil, Canada Hawkweed, Round Headed Bush Clover, Wild Bergamot, Black-eyed Susan, Hairy Goldenrod, Early Goldenrod, Grey Goldenrod, Upland White Aster, New England Aster, Sky Blue Aster, and Hoary Vervain,

Map of High Park

 
Spring 2016 planting in the Tablelands
June 12, 2016
The drought this summer was hard but not fatal
August 28, 2016
 
Planting native grasses in the Tablelands
Sept 13, 2015
We planted the adjacent site in Sept 2015
Sept 13, 2015
Goldenrods are great pollinator plants
Watch for them now in the TableLands
Spring planting in the Tablelands
June 2014
 

Summer sessions: Weeding and Watering in the Tablelands

June 26, July 10 and 24, Aug. 14 and 28

10:30 am to 12:30 pm. Meet in front of the Grenadier Restaurant

The likely site for August 28 is the Tablelands: The Tablelands (behind the Grenadier Restaurant)

The Targets: Garlic mustard, hedge parsley, ragweed, tall sweet white clover, and more!

Anyone interested in joining us is welcome to meet us in front of the Grenadier Restaurant at 10:30 and we will go to the site from there. For your protection, please dress as per the photo below, long sleeves and pants, closed shoes and socks, a hat and bring water and sunscreen. We will supply tools and gloves. Pingg invitation to this session

This spring has been very dry so we are going to help our newly planted site by watering if it doesn't rain enough in the next week. Although our native savannah plants require less water than others when established, our newly planted site was looking a bit crispy last week when we weeded. Urban Forestry has a "Rainbird" tank of water that we use to fill watering cans. We really hope it won't be necessary and that all of the plants in the park will be replenished naturally.

Maintenance aka weeding is as important as planting and equally rewarding. Once the weeds are removed the native plants have room to grow, display their beauty and do their work providing food and shelter for wildlife.

We will be working in our restoration sites weeding and monitoring the growth of native plants in the site. The Boulevard Beds group will also be working to update our demonstration garden.

We have a number of restoration areas where work has been going on for a number of years, including the Sculpure Garden site, the All-Star site, Site 10A near Bloor Street and The Tablelands (behind the Grenadier Restaurant).

The main suspects in High Park are Garlic Mustard, Hedge Parsley, Himalayan Balsam, Oriental Bittersweet, Ragweed, Sweet White Clover, Queen Anne's Lace, Motherwort, Burdock etc. Dog Strangling Vine is being handled by Urban Forestry.

It is really amazing how our group can make such a difference in one morning.

There will be a Walking Tour of our restoration sites on Aug. 21. Download the 2016 Sunday Walking Tours brochure

 

For more information on Restoration work Planting Native Species and Ecological Restoration. Of course there is also the ever-popular Invasive Plant Species

Steve Smith has generously provided us with a copy of his presentation to the High Park Stewards on Feb. 24, 2013. This is an excellent practical resource guide.Management of Invasive Species in Toronto Parks

On the updated Ontario noxious weed list are: common barberry, dog-strangling vine, European buckthorn, bull thistle, Canada thistle, wild carrot, Colt’s foot dodder, goat’s beard, Johnson grass, knapweed, nodding thistle, poison hemlock, poison ivy, proso millet, ragweed, yellow rocket, Russian thistle, Scotch thistle, sow thistle, cypress spurge, leafy spurge, tuberous vetchling, giant hogweed.

 
No hoses here, just buckets
Urban Forestry "Rainbird"
New plants need gentle watering
Many, many watering cans worth are needed
Our sites can use some help
Site 10A August 2012
Proper dress for all outdoor activities
We really want you to be protected
Garlic Mustard
WE COLLECTED 40 BAGS ON MAY 22, 2016
Tall Sweet White Clover
one of the invasives we remove in early summer
Asian Bittersweet up close
High Park September 2010
Hedge Parsley
A problem all summer
Himalayan Balsam
one of the prettier invasives we remove in mid summer
Ragweed
A native plant but still invasive
Himalayan Balsam - Before
July 27, 2014
Himalayan Balsam - After
July 27, 2014
 
 

Spring Planting - Sunday, June 12

10:30 am to 12:30 pm. WE WORK IN RAIN BUT NOT LIGHTNING STORMS!

Meet us in front of the Grenadier Restaurant at 10:30 am. Tools provided. Please bring water, a hat, and cover your arms and legs. Please wear socks and closed shoes as well. Full Pingg Invite

We will be working in the Tablelands which is our oldest restoration site (over 20 years). We are continuing to plant in what used to be a concrete picnic area. You can easily see the results of our last 4 years of planting and the spring prescribed burn.

We hope to plant over 1000 forbes, grasses and shrubs so lots of hands are needed.

 
Fall 2015 planting in the Tablelands
Sept 13, 2015
Plants originate in the Native Plant Greenhouse
June 8, 2012
Wild Lupines are great pollinator plants
Watch for them now in the TableLands
Spring planting in the Tablelands
June 2014
 

Garlic Mustard Busting May 22, 2016

10:30 am to 12:30 pm

The High Park Stewards have been removing Garlic Mustard from a number of sites within the park for many years. Protocols on how best to control GM are changing all the time and we are always upgrading our skills.

We are able to notice a real positive effect from our work but there is still lots to do.

As many people as possible are needed as there is no end of this plant in High Park. Full Pingg Invite

Meet us in front of the Grenadier Restaurant at 10:30 am. Tools provided. Please bring water, a hat, and cover your arms and legs.

The Boulevard Beds group will also be working on our demonstration gardens located on the perimeter of the Grenadier Restaurant. A few people are needed to join them.

The Biodiversity and Education Awareness Network BEAN has excellent information on keeping this species from further damaging our forests.

Also see:

 

 

Garlic Mustard is an extremely aggressive invasive plant in woodland areas. Not only does it crowd out almost every other type of plant but is has an allelopathic agent that hinders their growth. Once removed native species can be planted to restore some biodiversity. Areas where GM has been removed need to be monitored and tended for at least 5 years as there is a strong seedbank and root system left behind.

Garlic Mustard can have very deep roots
removal early in the season is much easier
Garlic Mustard
yes, it does smell like garlic and mustard
 

Native Plant Sale Sunday, May 8th, 2016

The TTC is running shuttle buses on May 8, please plan accordingly.

Photos, handouts and more info.

Map to Native Plant Sale and Greenhouse

The sale will take place in front of the Greenhouse from 11:00 am to 2:00 pm. In order to have plants for everyone to enjoy, large orders will be available only after 1:00 from the remaining stock.

Cash only. Parking is VERY limited at the Grenadier Restaurant. Please use transit, walk or bike if cherry blossoms are in bloom as expected.

Assistance in carrying plants will be provided.

This plant sale supports the work of the High Park Volunteer Stewardship Program and native plant restoration in High Park.

Helpers are needed for the following tasks at the Plant Sale: SIGNS AND POSTERS, SET UP: 9 – 11 AM, PLANT INFO, SALES, CASH, PLANT TAXI, DIRECTIONS, INFORMATION BOOTH, REFRESHMENTS, TAKE DOWN.

Please email stewards@highparknature.org to volunteer. Plant Sale Volunteer Tasks


Sunday April 17 and 24, 2016

Nursery and Boulevard Beds Spring Maintenance

View Celebrations invitation,

 

10:30 am to 12:30 pm, Meet in front of the Grenadier Restaurant

We plan to be doing a cleanup in the Boulevard Beds and in the Nursery, cutting down winter's growth and raking to uncover the plants that have survived the winter.

At the Nursery, please use the East Gate, the one near the green Stewards shed.

The Boulevard Beds are getting an exciting make-over this year. The group will be working in front of the Grenadier Restaurant parking lot uncovering the existing plants, removing old stalks and transplanting new native plants from the Nursery if weather allows.

All tools will be provided, but dress in layers and be prepared for muddy ground as the temperature is unpredictable.

Please bring anything you may wish to drink or snack on with you as there is no kitchen available.

 
Getting a jump on spring cleaning
Spring 2014
There's lots of hands needed in the Nursery
Spring 2014
Native plants awaken in the Boulevard Beds
April 22, 2012
Stewards Cleanup and Transplanting
be part of the Boulevard Bed redesign
 
Stewards work in rain or shine
April 10, 2011
April is for planting in the Boulevard Beds
April 22, 2012
 

Sunday, April 10, 2016

Toronto's Ravines and Urban Forests:

A look at Toronto's greatest civic treasure, and the efforts applied to protecting, preserving and enhancing our city's natural heritage.

TTC: The Bloor subway is running shuttle buses on April 10 so please leave extra time.

View Celebrations invitation

Directions

10:30 am to 12:30 pm

Howard Park Tennis Club, 430 Parkside Drive M6R 2Z3.

Speaker: Jason Ramsay-Brown

Explore the current state of Toronto's natural environment, its challenges, and opportunities to get involved and improve this precious asset.

The wilderness outside the window, under the bridge, down the alley, or right in our own backyard is perhaps far more the soul of the city than any of its buildings, roads, or historic landmarks. It provides us with opportunities to connect with our natural world, and with each other. It purifies our water and cleans our air. It provides an aesthetic beauty that has inspired the imaginations of artists from Doris McCarthy to Ernest Hemingway.

It has captured and preserved the relics of human history spanning millenniums past. It defines, sustains, protects, and invigorates us. Join Jason for an hour long presentation on Toronto's amazing tapestry of ravines and urban forests and the efforts we've taken and will take to protect, preserve and enhance our city's natural heritage.

 

Jason Ramsay-Brown is a lifelong Torontonian, and passionate student of Toronto's local history and natural heritage. He is a volunteer on the Todmorden Mills Wildflower Preserve Stewardship Team and the Beechwood Wetland Stewardship Team, and represents the Toronto Field Naturalists on the City of Toronto's Ravine Strategy Advisory Group.

In addition to the book Toronto's Ravines and Urban Forests, Jason has photographed and written about Toronto's ravines for a variety of publications including NOW magazine and the TFN newsletter.

Now available: Toronto's Ravines & Urban Forests by Jason Ramsay-Brown

 

Sunday, March 13, 2016

Transplanting in the Greenhouse

View Celebrations invitation, Directions

 

10:30 am to 12:30 pm, Meet at the High Park Greenhouse, Greenhouse Road

DST: Please set clocks ahead 1 hour on Sat. night.

For all current Stewards

Greenhouse work is very popular, but due to space limitations we must restrict the number of participants to those who are currently on our email list.

It's finally time to begin the seeding process and transplant the seedlings that have been growing over the winter in the greenhouse. These will be used for plantings in different parks and for our native plant sale. Due to the cold weather please meet us in the main greenhouse first and we will go to the cold frame if necessary. All tools will be provided, but dress in layers as the temperature is unpredictable.

Please bring anything you may wish to drink or snack on with you as there is no kitchen available.

 

For more information on planting for restoration projects. See page 20 in particular for growing techniques: - Planting the Seed (pdf) Environment Canada

Getting a jump on spring
Some of these plants may be available at our native plant sale
Repotting the new seedlings
These are started early from seeds collected in the park
 

Sunday, February 28, 2016

The Natural Environment in Toronto:

An exploration of citizen advocacy and partnerships with the City of Toronto

LINK TO PRESENTATION

View Celebrations invitation

Directions

10:30 am to 12:30 pm

Howard Park Tennis Club, 430 Parkside Drive M6R 2Z3.

Speakers: Jessica Iraci, M.Sc., Urban Forestry, City of Toronto;

Steven Parkes, M.F.C, Urban Forestry, City of Toronto

Explore the current state of Toronto's natural environment, its challenges, and opportunities to get involved and improve this precious asset.

Looking at High Park and other examples of effective, successful citizen advocacy throughout Toronto's past 20 years, this talk will leave you inspired and full of ideas and tips to conserve and protect nature in Toronto.

The urban natural environment is an invaluable part of the healthy functioning of the City of Toronto and its inhabitants. It's common knowledge that green spaces improve the environment, physical health of citizens, and economy of neighbourhoods. However, with a rising population, demand for mixed-use spaces, and increasingly erratic weather, there is more pressure to maintain, protect, and expand natural areas. Citizen advocacy has proven to be an effective method for enacting change, socially, politically, and environmentally.

This talk will explore the current state of the natural environment, the challenges we face, and the opportunities available for improving this asset.

 
A public volunteer planting in Scarborough in 2015
photo: City of Toronto

Jessica Iraci is currently a Parks Programs Officer with Natural Environment and Community Programs, in Urban Forestry with the City of Toronto. She coordinates theCommunity Stewardship Program, a City program that engages volunteers in stewardship and planting throughout the City. She graduated from the University of Toronto with a B.Sc. in biology and environmental science and received her Master's in Forestry in 2012. Her research focused on the sustainability of forest management techniques.

Brick Works volunteers in 2014
photo: City of Toronto

Steven Parkes has a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Biology, and a Masters in Forest Conservation. Steven's experiences include forest vegetation surveying with the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, planning residential street trees for Urban Forestry, and now works in Urban Forestry for the City of Toronto with community groups to plant and maintain naturalization sites in the City of Toronto.

Green Toronto Stewardship Program and Green Toronto Brochure

 

The presentation will be followed by a discussion of stewardship and celebrating nature with members of various stewardship groups in the city.

 

Sunday, February 14, 2016

Seed Cleaning in the Greenhouse

for Active Stewards

View Celebrations invitation

Greenhouse Directions

10:30 am to 12:30 pm

High Park Greenhouse, Greenhouse Road

Seed Cleaning in the Greenhouse is very popular, but due to space limitations we must restrict the number of participants to those who have braved the elements and assisted in planting, invasive species removal, at our native plant sale, or are a core member working on special projects. This special activity is a benefit for helping out during the past year.

RSVP to invitation is required. If you have planted or removed invasive species with the Stewards in the past year and did not receive an invitation by Feb. 9, please contact stewards@highparknature.org.'''

Seed Cleaning is the separation of the usually tiny seeds from the dried flower heads, collected in High Park in the last year. Planting these separated seeds has proven to be very successful in cultivating as many rare and limited back oak savannah plants as possible.

 

For more information on using seeds in restoration projects. See page 23 in particular for seed cleaning: - Planting the Seed (pdf) Environment Canada

Some low-tech tools of the trade
Greenhouse, Winter 2014
Separating the seeds from the flower pod/head
Butterfly Milkweed is one of the easier seeds to separate
 

 

Did our habitat restoration effort work? - Jan 24, 2016

Benchmarking and tracking the recovery of black oak savanna and other ecosystems

Rondeau 2009, Poison Ivy
photo: Dawn Bazely

Speaker: Dr. Dawn Bazely, Faculty in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, York University

10:30 am to 12:30 pm

Howard Park Tennis Club, 430 Parkside Drive Toronto, ON M6R 2Z3

The first light S. of Bloor from Keele. It's the brown building in the back. Please enter via the bottom door. Free.

Full Pingg invite

Dawn has shared her Slideshow with us

"Habitat restoration, in one form or another, has been going on for centuries. Ecological Restoration is a great field for encouraging citizen science participation. But, how do we know if our restoration efforts are a success, and whether we are actually doing more harm than good?

I'll tackle questions such as: is it possible to eradicate an invasive species?

I will be talking about oak savanna restoration in Ontario -- both the research into what needs to be done and the research that assesses how successful the restoration efforts are.

My talk will interest a wide audience -- from keen citizen science ecologists, to gardeners interested in planting more native species." - Dawn Bazely

Dawn Bazely is professor of Biology in the Faculty of Science at York University, Toronto, where she has taught since 1990. She was Director of IRIS, the university-wide Institute for Research and Innovation in Sustainability (2006-11 and 2012-13). At IRIS, Dawn’s mission was to develop, lead and support interdisciplinary research on diverse fronts. The Globe and Mail's 2013 Canadian University Report singled her out as York University's HotShot Professor.

The Bazely Lab at York U An ongoing Initiative in Research & Innovation in Sustainability.

Additional information:

High Park Stewards Oak Monitoring
June 26, 2007
Dawn trained as an ecologist, in the field of plant-herbivore interactions, and she has carried out extensive field research in grasslands and forests, from temperate to arctic regions. Dawn has a B.Sc. in Biogeography and Environmental Studies and an M.Sc. in Botany from the University of Toronto. Her D.Phil. in Zoology, from Oxford University’s Edward Grey Institute in Field Ornithology, looked at sheep grazing behaviour.

After nearly 20 years away from arctic fieldwork, Dawn returned to the north in 2002 for field work in Sweden. In 2006, she led the Canadian section of the International Polar Year project: GAPS, Gas, Arctic Peoples and Security. As well as publishing dozens of journal articles, chapters, conference proceeding papers, and technical reports,

Dawn wrote the textbook, Ecology and Control of Introduced Plants: Evaluating and responding to invasive plants, (2003 monograph with Judith Myers), and she co-edited Environmental and Human Security in the Arctic, (2013). She contributed to the 2nd edition of Ecology: A Canadian Context by Bill Freedman et al. (2014).

In 2011, Dawn received a Charles Bullard Fellowship from Harvard University, to work on a book examining conservation and ecological issues in Southern Ontario, Canada from scientific, policy and political perspectives.)

 
High Park Oct 31, 2015
photo Dawn Bazely
Monitoring requires patience
photo Dawn Bazely
 

Additional Links from Dawn:

 

Why don’t ecologists get more respect? Dawn R. Bazely Biology Department, York University, Toronto Wed 29 Oct 2014, Carolinian Canada Ecoystem Recovery Forum, Royal Botanic Gardens, Hamilton, ON, Canada

 

Invasive Plants of Canadian Woodlands – Scientific Challenges

 

A study of prescribed burns, tree and shrub layer in oak savanna plant communities in Southern Ontario: Pinery Provincial Park, Rondeau Provincial Park and Point Pelee National Park

 

The Distribution and Abundance of Fire-scarred Trees in Pinery Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada

 

Determining an appropriate fire frequency for restoration and maintenance of oak savannas in Pinery Provincial Park


 

Keeping it Wild in Canada: From caribou to sturgeon, and science to protection - Jan 10, 2016

Northern Caribou
photo: Susan C. Morse

Speaker: Gillian Woolmer, Assistant Director, Wildlife Conservation Society Canada

10:30 am to 12:30 pm

Howard Park Tennis Club, 430 Parkside Drive Toronto, ON M6R 2Z3

The first light S. of Bloor from Keele. It's the brown building in the back. Please enter via the bottom door. Free. Full Pingg invite

What the future holds for wildlife has never been more uncertain. For animals that range across Canada’s vast northern regions - like caribou, wolverine and lake sturgeon - the lands and waters they depend on are changing. Both natural resource development and climate change are damaging their habitat. With a team of scientists, WCS Canada is focused on researching wildlife, their habitat needs and the impacts they experience from development and climate change. Gillian Woolmer, Assistant Direct, will share WCS Canada’s science based approach to conservation and stories from collective years of on-the-ground field work.

Wildlife Conservation Society Canada WCS saves wildlife and wild places worldwide through science, conservation action, education, and inspiring people to value nature.

Gillian Woomer As Assistant Director of the WCS Canada Country Program Gillian leads the WCS Northern Appalachian Program and oversees operational management of WCS Canada. Gillian's conservation focus is on ecoregional conservation planning and the application of spatial analysis tools – GIS and remote sensing – to support conservation.

Gillian is currently chair of the 2C1Forest Science Team and manages the 2C1Forest online mapping atlas and GIS data warehouse (2c1forest.databasin.org). With over 15 years of experience using GIS, Gillian has collaborated on a diverse array of conservation projects, including rates of deforestation in Sumatra, Sudden Oak Death Syndrome in California, mandrill habitat use in Gabon and the identification of caribou wintering grounds in Ontario.

 
Doe emerging from the forest
photo taken in Haliburton Forest
Grey Wolf
photo taken at Haliburton Wolf Centre
 

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